ISSN Print: 2381-1277  ISSN Online: 2381-1285
AASCIT Journal of Health  
Manuscript Information
 
 
Dietary Factors and Prostate Benign Hyperplasia in Western Algeria
AASCIT Journal of Health
Vol.2 , No. 2, Publication Date: May 8, 2015, Page: 7-12
1333 Views Since May 8, 2015, 638 Downloads Since May 8, 2015
 
 
Authors
 
[1]    

Abdelkrim Berroukche, Research Laboratory of Environment and Health (RLEH), Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital - Complex (UHC), Sidi-Bel-Abbes, Algeria;.

[2]    

Malika Bendahmane, Research Laboratory of Environment and Health (RLEH), Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital - Complex (UHC), Sidi-Bel-Abbes, Algeria; Research laboratory of Water Sources and Environment, Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Tahar Moulay University, Saida, Algeria.

[3]    

Kadda Hachem, Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Tahar Moulay University, Saida, Algeria.

[4]    

Kaddour Ziani, Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Tahar Moulay University, Saida, Algeria.

[5]    

Abdelkrim Badreddine Kandouci, Research Laboratory of Environment and Health (RLEH), Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital - Complex (UHC), Sidi-Bel-Abbes, Algeria.

 
Abstract
 

Background. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common prostate disease in elderly men. A few risk factors have been established for BPH. Aim of this study is to assess the association between dietary factors and BPH. Methods. A retrospective study was performed in Western Algeria during 2006-2012. A total of 320 cases, with histological BPH confirmed, and 320 controls old over 50 years were included in this study. A food frequency questionnaire was used to assess patients’ dietary habits. The odds ratio (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by conditional multiple logistic regression models. Results. A significant positive association of more frequent intakes with an increasing BPH risk was found for red meat (OR 2.4 for the greatest versus lowest quartile), milk (OR 1.9), dairy products (OR 2.0). Inverse associations were observed for fish (OR 0.8), olive oil (OR 0.6), tomato (OR 0.8), green tee (OR 0.7) and coffee (OR 0.6). Conclusion. The results of this study suggest a role for dietary habits on the risk of BPH. a diet rich in fatty acids that may have a disadvantage effect in Algerian population.


Keywords
 

Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, Dietary Factors, Food Frequency Questionnaire, Fatty Acids


Reference
 
[01]    

Andersson SO, Rashidkhani B, Karlberg L, Wolk A, Johansson JE. Prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms in men aged 45–79 years: a population-based study of 40 000 Swedish men. BJU Int 2004, 94: 327–331.

[02]    

Suzuki S, Platz EA, Kawachi I, Willett WC, Giovannucci E. Intakes of energy and macronutrients and the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Am J Clin Nutr 2002, 75: 689–697.

[03]    

Signorello LB, Tzonou A, Lagiou P, Samoli E, Zavitsanos X, Trichopoulos D. The epidemiology of benign prostatic hyperplasia: a study in Greece. BJU Int 1999, 84: 286–291.

[04]    

Araki H, Watanabe H, Mishina T, Nakao M. High-risk group for benign prostatic hypertrophy. Prostate 1983, 4 : 253–264.

[05]    

Lagiou P, Wuu J, Trichopoulou A, Hsieh C, Adami H, Trichopoulos D. Diet and benign prostatic hyperplasia: a study in Greece. Urology 1999, 54 : 284–290.

[06]    

Denis L, Morton MS, and Griffiths K. Diet and its preventive role in prostatic disease. Eur Urol 1999, 35: 377–387.

[07]    

Czopp A, Serfati M. Enquête sur l’alimentation des étudiants. Accessed 2007 June 5, http://www.siumpps.univparis5. Fr.

[08]    

Chyou PH, Nomura AMY, Stemmermann GN, Hankin JH. A prospective study of alcohol, diet, and other lifestyle factors in relation to obstructive uropathy. Prostate 1993, 22: 253–264.

[09]    

Bravi F, Bosetti C, Dalmaso L, Talamini R, Montella M, Negri E. Food groups and risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Urology 2006, 67: 73–79.

[10]    

Dorgan JF, Judd JT, Longcope C, Brown C, Schatzkin A, Clevidence BA. Effects of dietary fat and fiber on plasma and urine androgens and estrogens in men: a controlled feeding study. Am J Clin Nutr 1996, 64: 850–855.

[11]    

Wolk A. Diet, lifestyle and risk of prostate cancer. Acta Oncologica 2005, 44: 277–281.

[12]    

Ambrosini GL, De Klerk NH, Mackerras D, Leavy J, Fritschi L. Dietary patterns and surgically treated benign prostatic hyperplasia: a case control study in Western Australia. BJU International 2007, 101: 853-860.

[13]    

Doumerc N. Thé vert et cancer de prostate. Actualité du Moment 2006, 2: 11–13.

[14]    

Bosetti C, Micelotta S, Dal Maso L, Talamini R, Montella M, Negri E. Food groups and risk of prostate cancer in Italy. Int J Cancer 2004, 110: 424–428.

[15]    

Gass R. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: the opposite effects of alcohol and coffee intake. BJU Int 2002, 90: 649–654.

[16]    

Wilson KM, Kasperzyk JL, Rider JR, Kenfield S, van Dam RM, Stampfer MJ. Coffee consumption and prostate cancer risk and progression in the health professionals follow-up study. J Natl Cancer Inst 2011, 103: 1–9.





 
  Join Us
 
  Join as Reviewer
 
  Join Editorial Board
 
share:
 
 
Submission
 
 
Membership